Characters

In this comedic play we have taken some of the characters from pop mythology and fleshed them out with tensions between the modern world and their total dedication to fulfilling their assigned roles. We have given them backstories that help explain or govern their actions.

Characters, in order of appearance:

DEATH: Pronouns It/Its. Transports recently deceased humans into the afterlife. Does not understand why humans don’t like it. DEATH considers itself an entertainer, but does not differentiate between wars & rock concerts and it is still bitter about being thrown out of its former band “The Hoarsemen” (i.e. The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse). Julia says “The big D is a really fun character to write for, it doesn’t lack empathy, but simply doesn’t connect with people this makes it a great mouthpiece for some incredibly dark humour that I could never say as myself”

The Easter Bunny. Pronouns She/Her (probably, like the Tooth Fairy, the Easter bunny is both male and female). Former anthropomorphic personification of the return of life and fertility in the spring, now a deliverer of chocolate eggs. The play centres around her desperate attempts to finance her supply of chocolate for the eggs with many references to her (off-duty, off-stage) highly sex positive outlook carried over from her former role. Tessa says “Easter Bunny comes across as a bit sweet and innocent even though she has, quite a sharp mind”

The Tooth Fairy. Pronouns She/Her, although historically the fairy has been depicted as both male and female and may be cast to be performed by a male. Trader in baby teeth since 1908. Financially secure for undisclosed reasons, but she does manufacture & sell knockoff fairy dust. Tessa says “She is very practical and tends to be a bit like the school dental nurse about oral hygiene”

Famine. Pronouns uncertain. DEATH’s former bandmate & rival in The Hoarsemen who is currently transitioning to a new role. Julia says “This is either the most thoroughly evil character I have ever written or a neo-liberal” Tessa says “As a strong unionist it is such fun to play a character who is so opposed to everything I believe in.”

HR. Pronouns It, It’s. Humourless, pedantic bureaucrat. It’s primary purpose in “life” is to create problems for the front-line staff with crazy corporate policies. Julia says “I worked for many years in corporate environments, so I made HR a soulless bureaucrat” Tessa says “HR comes across as a bossy spinster who doesn’t have much of a life outside of her job.“

War, Pestilence, humans & The Amputation Angel are referred to but are not currently expected to make on-stage appearances